Results tagged ‘ Joe DiMaggio ’

All Quiet on the Eastern Front…

 

How come there are no players available through Groupon?…

It’s a new year but the new fiscally-responsible Yankees are still in late-2012’s penny-pinching mode and all remains quiet at River and 161st.

The latest move is the waiver pickup of utility man Russ Canzler who can play the corners and some outfield.  By all accounts, he is less talented than the guy he replaced on the 40-man roster (outfielder Chris Dickerson) but a better fit overall.  I only hope the Yankees are able to flip Dickerson, who was DFA’d, for a decent prospect.  There’s no doubt the Yankees need good depth behind third baseman Kevin Youkilis who has not exactly been the pillar of health in recent years.

At this point, I would be really surprised to see the Yankees make any bold moves.  It appears they are willing to go to spring training to see what shakes out.  A few years ago, when Mark Teixeira left the Los Angeles Angels via free agency, the Angels’ farm system produced Kendrys Morales as a very capable replacement.  When Morales went down to a season-ending injury a year or so later, Mark Trumbo stepped up.  Of course, the Yankees do not have that type of depth in the farm system, particularly at first base, but there’s always the possibility that someone somewhere unexpectedly takes it to the next level.

Clearly, the Yankees would benefit greatly by having a few more cost-controlled young players on the roster.  But as far as major league ready prospects go, the Yankees need another year or two as the best talent is still in the lower levels.  I guess that means we’ll see more Russ Canzler type moves as GM Brian Cashman tries to capture lightning in a bottle.

If the Yankees underperform in 2013, are manager Joe Girardi and/or Cashman at risk for losing their jobs?  Or does the team’s current reduced spending posture mean ownership will be more tolerant of losses?  It remains to be seen but this is clearly putting Girardi and Cashman in the proverbial hot seats.

Scott Hairston, if your choices are the Mets or the Yankees, what are you waiting for?  Your brother looked great in pinstripes and you can too!  With Curtis Granderson, Brett Gardner, and Ichiro Suzuki as the starters, you are assured of receiving numerous quality at-bat’s in the Bronx and you are wanted by the team.  I might be biased but who wouldn’t want to put on the same jersey as Lou Gehrig, Babe Ruth, Joe DiMaggio and so many other legends?…

Maybe we should just flip a coin to see who makes the play-offs…

I am glad to see the NHL has finally resolved its differences with the players and have agreed upon a new collective bargaining agreement.  However, it will be tough, admittedly, to be energized about a 48- or 50-game season.  If your favorite team struggles at the start of the season, it could possibly cost them play-off contention.  An entire season would have looked radically different than the upcoming shortened season.  Every year, new stars and heroes emerge and I wonder about the guys who could have been that star but now may never get the opportunity.  I guess pure talent perseveres, but still, there were far too many sacrifices made for the lockout.

Play-off loss, but a very successful season…

I was not optimistic about the Minnesota Vikings’ chances against the Green Bay Packers last weekend, particularly given the game was being held at Lambeau Field.  I did not realize that Christian Ponder’s elbow injury threatened his ability to play so Sunday’s announcement that he had been ruled inactive came as a shock.  The designated starter, Joe Webb, had not started a NFL game in two years.  Say what you will about quality practices and reps, but there’s nothing better than playing the games.  So, I did not expect Webb to provide a championship performance.  He didn’t, and the 24-10 loss was pretty much as expected.

Nevertheless, what a terrific season by the Vikings!  At the beginning of the year, the talk was the team would be drafting high in April 2013, perhaps as high as second or third.  Yet, the team won 10 games and made the play-offs over the Chicago Bears.  Adrian Peterson’s 2,097 rushing yards was an incredible accomplishment.  I remember being envious of the Bears when Walter Payton was playing as it was clear he was head and shoulders above everyone else.  But the Vikings have that guy in Peterson.  It was a special season to build upon and hopefully it will propel the Vikings to legitimate contender status in 2013.

Happy New Year to All!

–Scott

 

If you wear #51 for the Mariners, you are a future Yankee!…

 

I thought I was supposed to wear the white uniform!…

In recent years, it has seemed as though no Yankee trade sneaks up on you.  Even with Curtis Granderson, there were rumors swirling around before the deal was finally consummated.  It has seemed like the press has been tapped into GM Brian Cashman’s inner thoughts.  But admittedly, the Ichiro Suzuki trade surprised me.

Years ago, this would have been a headline deal but it’s now obviously the acquisition of a former great player in the twilight of his career.

In recent weeks, I had seen other owners in fantasy leagues start to drop Ichiro from their rosters.  I had not been keeping up with his stats but I knew he was no longer the player he once was.  But if anything, Derek Jeter has shown what goes down does not necessarily have to stay down.  Some are suggested that Ichiro will be revitalized in the midst of a pennant race and the spotlight of New York.  Maybe so, maybe not.  But if you asked me if I prefer Ichiro in the outfield over DeWayne Wise or exposing Andruw Jones or Raul Ibanez to too much play, the answer would be, without hesitation, yes.  I was a bit disappointed when I first heard the news of the trade as visions of Shane Victorino or Denard Span were dancing in my head.  Yet, the realist in me knows that the cost to acquire either of those players would have exceeded the reward.  On the other hand, Ichiro is simply a rental for the remainder of the season.  He’ll be a free agent in the off-season so he’ll hand left field back to Brett Gardner when he departs the Stadium in October.

I remember the thrill of seeing my first game at Safeco Field.  The player I was most interested in seeing was Ichiro and he did not disappoint.  He came through with a few clutch hits and showed why he has been one of the better players over the past decade.  The Yankees have missed a clutch bat so hopefully a revitalized Ichiro means that they’ll have the “pest” they need at the plate and on the base paths.

I know that the pitchers the Yankees gave up were not top shelf talent (D.J. Mitchell and Danny Farquahar) but they have the chance to be good major league pitchers.  I always hate to see good talent leave, especially if Ichiro’s days in pinstripes do not go beyond the next couple of months.  I always remember how much I hated watching Jay Buhner punish the Yankees while wearing a Mariners uniform and wondering what could have been if the Yanks had held on to him.  Now, with former top prospect Jesus Montero in Seattle, there are multiple players in the Great Northwest who could haunt their former team.  The Mariners go for 20-something former Yankees while the Yankees go for almost 40-something ex-Mariners.  I think the M’s have the better business formula even if it isn’t showing up in wins quite yet.

Now that I’ve gotten over the shock of the trade, I will admit that it is nice to see Ichiro in a Yankees uniform.  It will be even better if he can get on base with consistency and make crossing home plate a common occurrence.

If there’s one thing about the trade that struck me as unusual, it is the consummation of the deal prior to the start of the Yankees-Mariners series in Seattle.  The trade guaranteed the Mariners fans would be subjected to watching the first three games of Ichiro’s post-Seattle career in an opposing uniform.  Not any uniform but the most hated and despised uniform in most parts of the country outside of NYC.  The Yankees apparently had conditions Ichiro had to agree to (batting in the bottom of the order, moving to left, and accepting an outfield rotation to get the bats of Jones and Ibanez into the lineup).  So, perhaps the Yankees had the upper hand in this deal and argued that it had to happen sooner rather the later.  For the Mariners, the motivation is clearly to move on and to further develop their further stars.

After the Cliff Lee debacle when he went to the Texas Rangers for Justin Smoak after the Yankees thought they had acquired him, I really didn’t think the Yankees would forgive the Mariners and their general manager.  But after the Michael Pineda and Ichiro deals, there is no evidence of hard feelings.  Cliff Lee just wasn’t meant to be a Yankee.  He proved that with his own decision to rebuke the team to re-sign with the Philadelphia Phillies.  Lee is a good pitcher but some guys weren’t meant for Broadway.

The question now is if the Yankees are done dealing before the trading deadline.  With the returns of Joba Chamberlain and Andy Pettitte looming on the horizon, perhaps they are the moves that can catapult the Yankees to the World Series.  I can’t really think of another move the Yankees need to make other than further enhancing an already good bullpen.  Sure, if the Philadelphia Phillies called to say that they’d trade Roy Halladay for Ivan Nova, you’d pull the trigger, but seriously, that’s not going to happen.

For the lack of better words, Ouch!…

After moving back to the Bay Area and living in what is described as A’s territory, it was really tough to see the Yankees swept in four games against the upstart A’s.  While the Yankees hold a 7 game lead, the race is far from over.  I still expect the Tampa Bay Rays to make a run, and of course, I am always fearful the Boston Red Sox make some major moves that propel them back into contention.  I’d be foolish to underestimate Buck Showalter and the Baltimore Orioles.  So, every day, Brian Cashman needs to be trying to find ways to improve the team.  The nice thing is that I know he is.

Open the Cooperstown doors now…

I think I read recently that Mariano Rivera would like to make his return in September rather than next spring.  While I doubt he’ll be able to do it, I wouldn’t be surprised if he did.  He is clearly one of the most gifted athletes of our time.  He is my favorite current Yankee and he’ll be on the fast track to Cooperstown when he retires.  I am sure that his spot in Memorial Park has already been reserved, along with Derek Jeter’s.  It would have been great to watch guys like Lou Gehrig, Joe DiMaggio, Yogi Berra and Mickey Mantle play, but I am glad that I lived in the Rivera/Jeter era.  I look forward to telling my grandchildren that I saw the game’s greatest closer play.  As a kid, I thought Rich “Goose” Gossage was the greatest closer. I never realizvbbbbb

But are they Yankees fans?…

I am the proud owner of two rescue kittens named Nathalia and Sophie.  They are sisters and at times, they are the synchronized twins.  Two American Shorthairs, both black and one with with a white undercoat, they have proven their love of baseball.  During the recent Yankees-Red Sox series in Boston, the sisters were engrossed in watching the game, just like their roommate (me).  I love this pic…

 

 

And the winner is…

The next week should be fun as teams race against the trading deadline.  Maybe it will be quiet, maybe not.  I fully expect the Red Sox and in particular, GM Ben Cherington, to make a bold move.  I respect Cubs pitcher Ryan Dempster for preferring to pitch for the Los Angeles Dodgers over the Atlanta Braves (I should qualify that by saying my favorite NL team is the Dodgers).  The Tigers have been active as evidenced by their recent acquisitions of Anibal Sanchez and Omar Infante.  I saw tonight that the Pittsburgh Pirates were close to acquiring Wandy Rodriguez, who has long been on the radar for both the Yanks and Red Sox.  I almost missed the trade of Astros closer Brett Myers to the Chicago White Sox.  I think the Sox have the market cornered on goatees.

I am still missing Minneapolis but I am enjoying this baseball season.  Life is good.

–Scott

P.S.  Looking for some great photos?  Check out Erik van den Ham’s website, http://www.panoramio.com/user/62613.  Excellent!

 

 

 

 

Your Attention Please…A Yankee Great Remembered…

The “Voice of God” has been silenced…



Bob Sheppard Yankees

Chris Faytok/The Star Ledger

 


The voice of Yankees Stadium, Bob Sheppard, has
passed away at the age of 99.  Sheppard’s
health did not allow him to handle the PA duties at the new Yankee Stadium, so
he will forever be linked as a part of the old Yankee Stadium which ended its
run following the 2008 season. 
Sheppard’s last game was September 17, 2007.

 

Paul Olden has been the PA announcer since the team
opened the new Yankee Stadium in 2009, however, Derek Jeter has continued to
use a recorded tape of Sheppard’s voice to announce his plate appearances.  He’ll continue the practice even though
Sheppard has departed.

 

I am glad that I had the numerous opportunities to
hear Sheppard’s voice at the old Stadium. 
He will always be a huge part of Yankees history, and his voice will
live on.

 

It’s incredible to think of the players that
Sheppard announced over the course of his career.  His first game was April 17, 1951, which,
ironically, was also Mickey Mantle’s first game.  Here is the box score from the game:

 

April 17, 1951 at Yankee Stadium

New York Yankees 5, Boston Red Sox 0

Red Sox

AB

R

H

RBI

Dom DiMaggio, cf

3

0

2

0

Billy Goodman, rf

3

0

1

0

Ted Williams, lf

3

0

1

0

Vern Stephens, 3b

4

0

0

0

Walt Dropo, 1b

4

0

1

0

Bobby Doerr, 2b

4

0

0

0

Lou Boudreau, ss

4

0

1

0

Buddy Rosar, c

2

0

0

0

Bill Wight, p

2

0

0

0

   Ellis
Kinder, p

0

0

0

0

   Charlie
Maxwell, p

1

0

0

0

   Mickey
McDermott, p

0

0

0

0

Totals

30

0

6

0

 

Yankees

AB

R

H

RBI

Jackie Jensen, lf

4

2

2

2

Phil Rizzuto, ss

3

1

0

0

Mickey Mantle, rf

4

1

1

1

Joe DiMaggio, cf

4

0

1

1

Yogi Berra, c

2

0

1

1

Johnny Mize, 1b

3

0

0

0

   Joe
Collins, 1b

0

0

0

0

Billy Johnson, 3b

2

0

0

0

Jerry Coleman, 2b

3

1

2

0

Vic Raschi, p

2

0

0

0

Totals

27

5

7

5

 

Boston Red Sox

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

-

 

0

New York Yankees

0

0

2

 

0

0

3

 

0

0

x

-

 

5

 

E-Boudreau (1). 
DP-Boston 2 (Wight-Boudreau-Dropo, Boudreau-Doerr-Dropo), New York 3 (DiMaggio-Mize,
Rizzuto-Coleman-Mize, Rizzuto-Coleman-Collins).  2B-NY Jensen (1, off Wight).  HR-NY Jensen (1, 3rd inning off
Wight, 1 on 1 out).  Team LOB-7.  SH-Raschi (1, off Wight), Rizzuto (1, off
Wight).  Team-2.  U-HP-Bill McGowan, 1B-Bill McKinley, 2B-Jim
Honochick, 3B-Hank Soar.  T-2:12.  A-44,860.

 

Red Sox

IP

H

R

ER

BB

SO

Bill Wight (L, 0-1)

5.0

7

5

5

2

1

Ellis Kinder

1.0

0

0

0

0

0

Mickey McDermott

2.0

0

0

0

0

1

Totals

8.0

7

5

5

2

2

 

Yankees

IP

H

R

ER

BB

SO

Vic Raschi (W, 1-0)

9.0

6

0

0

4

6

Totals

9.0

6

0

0

4

6


For Bob Sheppard’s final game, the Yankees won
again to bookend his legendary career with wins.

 

September 17, 2007 at Yankee Stadium

New York Yankees 8, Baltimore Orioles 5

Orioles

AB

R

H

RBI

Brian Roberts, 2b

4

2

2

0

Tike Redman, cf

5

1

2

1

Nick Markakis, rf

5

1

2

3

Miguel Tejada, ss

2

0

0

0

   Luis
Hernandez, ph

1

0

0

0

Kevin Millar, 1b

5

0

3

0

Aubrey Huff, dh

4

0

1

1

Melvin Mora, 3b

5

0

1

0

Ramon Hernandez, c

4

0

1

0

Jay Payton, lf

4

1

1

0

   Brandon
Fahey, lf

0

0

0

0

Totals

39

5

13

5

 

Yankees

AB

R

H

RBI

Johnny Damon, cf

4

0

0

0

Derek Jeter, ss

5

1

2

0

Bobby Abreu, rf

5

0

2

2

Alex Rodriguez, 3b

3

0

1

1

Hideki Matsui, lf

5

1

1

1

Jorge Posada, c

5

1

3

0

Jason Giambi, dh

1

2

0

0

   Shelley
Duncan, pr-dh

0

0

0

0

Robinson Cano, 2b

4

1

2

1

Doug Mientkiewicz, 1b

1

1

1

2

Totals

33

8

13

8

 

Baltimore Orioles

2

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

1

0

2

-

 

5

New York Yankees

0

2

1

 

2

0

2

 

0

1

x

-

 

8

 

2B-Roberts (41, off Hughes), Markakis (41, off
Hughes), Millar (25, off Hughes), Payton (21, off Ramirez), Huff (31, off
Rivera), Cano (37, off Cabrera), Abreu (36, off Hoey), Jeter (33, off
Birkins).  HR-Matsui (24, 3rd
inning off Cabrera, 0 on 2 out). 
RBI-Markakis 3 (103), Redman (13), Huff (69), Mientkiewicz 2 (18),
Matsui (95), Cano (85), Damon (59), Abreu 2 (98), Rodriguez (142).  S-Mientkiewicz.  SF-Rodriguez.  LOB-Balt 11, NYY 12.  SB-Redman (5).  DP-NYY 1 ( Cano-Mientkiewicz).  U-HP-Jeff Kellogg, 1B-Eric Cooper, 2B-Andy
Fletcher, 3B-Mike Reilly.  T-3:54.  A-52,548.

 

Orioles

IP

H

R

ER

BB

SO

Daniel Cabrera (L, 9-18)

5.0

8

6

6

3

5

Jim Hoey

1.1

2

1

1

1

1

Kurt Birkins

1.1

3

1

1

3

1

Radhames Liz

0.1

0

0

0

0

0

Totals

8.0

13

8

8

7

7

 

Yankees

IP

H

R

ER

BB

SO

Phil Hughes (W, 5-3)

5.2

6

2

2

2

3

Edwar Ramirez (H, 3)

1.0

3

1

1

0

1

Luis Vizcaino (H, 13)

1.1

1

0

0

0

2

Kyle Farnsworth

0.2

2

2

2

1

0

Mariano Rivera (S, 30)

0.1

1

0

0

0

1

Totals

9.0

13

5

5

3

7

 


So long, Bob Sheppard.  Joltin’ Joe and the Mick are waiting for you
to announce their next game…

 

Hoff/NY Daily News



Saturday night, the Yankees lost a
heart-breaker.  On a night, when Cliff
Lee gave up 6 earned runs in the Baltimore Orioles’ pounding of the Texas
Rangers, 6-1, the man who was mentioned as the likely odd man out had the
Lee-to-the-Yankees trade been successful was stellar.  Javier Vazquez, who probably would have been
dealt to a National League club, went 7 innings and have up only 3 hits and no
runs.  He struck out 7 batters, while
only walking 2.  He left with a 1-0 lead,
however, his replacement, Joba Chamberlain promptly allowed a couple of hits, a
wild pitch, and an intentional pass to load the bases in the bottom of the 8th
for Jose Lopez.  Showing that the Yankees
bullpen is a much greater need for GM Brian Cashman than starting pitching,
Lopez delivered Chamberlain’s offering into the seats for a grand slam.   The Yankees tried to rally in the top of the
9th but they couldn’t come through. 
So, what should have been an awesome night for Vazquez turned into yet
another disappointing Joba performance. 



Joba Chamberlain Yankees Oakland cropped file

Kyle Terada/US Presswire

 


Fortunately, the team rebounded on Sunday to win
big, 8-2, behind CC Sabathia.  It was CC’s
12th win of the season (12-3) which matches Tampa’s David Price for
the league lead.  Sunday saw the Big 3 of
the AL East win (New York, Tampa and Boston), but the Yankees (56-32) hold a two-game
edge over the Rays.  The Red Sox are 5
games back.  I was glad to see the
Yankees end the first half on a positive note, particularly after Saturday’s
tough loss.  The second half starts off
as intensely as the first half when the Yankees welcome the Tampa Bay Rays to
Yankee Stadium on Friday night.  But for
a now, a few days off (well, at least for only about ‘half’ the team!). 



 


Well, it is time for my final “forced” spotlight on
a Boston Red Sox player (thanks to a wager loss to Julia of Julia’s
Rants
).  I thought about a paragraph for
Dice-K or John Lackey or Adrian Beltre or Victor Martinez, but I decided to go
with a player that will be a fixture in the Red Sox rotation for years to come…


 

#11      Clay
Buchholz

 


Charles Krupa/AP



Clay burst onto the major league scene in 2007 with
a no-hitter in just his second major league start.  On September 1, 2007, against the Baltimore
Orioles, he became the first Red Sox rookie to throw a no-hitter and just the
third major league pitcher to throw a no-hitter in his first and second start
since 1900. 



Boston Red Sox pitcher Clay Buchholz was hoisted up by catcher Jason Varitek after Buchholz pitched a no-hitter against the Baltimore Orioles at Fenway Park last night, putting the perfect touch on a 10-0 victory.

Winslow Townson/AP

 

He was born in Lumberton, Texas, on August 14, 1984,
so he’ll just be 26 when his birthday rolls around next month.

 

Clay was drafted in 2005 as a supplement pick
received as compensation for the loss of free agent pitcher Pedro
Martinez.  I guess Pedro truly was the
gift that keeps on giving to the RSN. 

 

He made his first start against the Los Angeles
Angels on August 17, 2007, and picked up the win in the Red Sox victory. 

 

His stay in the majors would be interrupted by
injury and several trips to the minors for the next couple of yeas.  He started 2009 at Pawtucket, and came up in
July and won a total of 7 games through the duration of the year. 

 

In 2010, he picked up where he left off, and was,
for a time, the leading Red Sox pitcher with 10 wins (10-4, 2.47 ERA).  He injured his hamstring running the bases in
San Francisco in late June that led to a trip to the Disabled List, but he is
expected to start in Boston’s first series following the All-Star Break.  He and Jon Lester form a very deadly duo in
the Red Sox rotation, and both should be stalwarts in the rotation for a very
long time. 

 

Here is Clay’s scouting report from
SoxProspects.com:

 

Scouting Report: Buchholz has a low-to-mid-90s four-seam fastball, a two-seam
fastball with decent movement, a slider, a hard 12-to-6 curveball, and a
changeup. His fastball typically sits around 91-94 mph, topping out at about 97
mph. However, he let loose at the end of the 2006 season, and his fastball sat
around 96 mph. His plus changeup is generally a straight change that sits
around 78-82 mph; he also throws a circle change.  His curveball, the best
in the organization, sits between 76-81 mph with a knee-buckling bite.  On
any given night, Buchholz’s curve or change can be unhittable, and he tends to
rely on whichever one is on as his out pitch throughout the game.  His
slider, while average to above average, is a bit behind his other secondary
pitches and sits in the low-to-mid-80s.  Mixes in all of his pitches
phenomenally.  Good demeanor on the mound.  Pitches well under
pressure, pitching coaches have said he has ice water running through his
veins.  Nice pick-off move.  He has struggled with consistency early
in his big-league career, but otherwise has ace makeup. Might need to add and
maintain some weight to endure a full major league season. In September
2007, in just his second career major league start, Buchholz threw a no-hitter
against the Baltimore Orioles.   In 2008, he had major struggles with
command and confidence, leading to lackluster results. Returned to form in 2009.

 

Clay’s name has been mentioned in the past with
possible trades for the likes of Roy Halladay and Adrian Gonzalez.  With consistency and good heath, Clay should
make himself ‘untouchable’ and I have no doubt he’ll reach his potential as a
future ace for the Red Sox.    



AP


Julia, with that, I am done!  :)


–Scott

The Tradition Continues…

Without much surprise, Curtis Granderson was named the latest Yankees center fielder…

 

 

Curtis Granderson is pumped up about being named the starting center fielder for the New York Yankees.

Gene J. Puskar/AP

 

…in a long line of great center fielders. 

 

 

56

AP

 

 

 

 

 

Gene J. Puskar/AP

 

AP

 

 

AP

 

 

While I think playing catcher for the Yankees is very prestigious given the great catchers past and present, center field is clearly THE position for the Yankees.  Well, Derek Jeter would tell you shortstop, but there have been few ‘great’ Yankees shortstops until DJ came along.  Scooter held the unofficial title as franchise best until Jeter, but the rest have been good but not great.  Sorry Bucky, the home run in 1978 was fantastic, but you still have to be put in the ‘good, not great’ category…

 

 

 

 

Jack Curry of YES Network.com has written the article that I have feared.  This could very well be Andy Pettitte’s final season before he heads home for good to Deer Park, Texas.  I always thought that Andy would be one to retire too soon rather than too late.  I didn’t expect to see him pitching into his 40’s like his former good friend Roger Clemens or the Phillies fifth starter Jamie Moyer.  I actually thought Andy might call it a career after last year’s World Championship, so I was somewhat surprised he made the decision to return so quickly this past off-season. 

 

But the comments Andy makes in the Curry interview are the strongest yet that I’ve heard Andy publicly say and it does sound like someone who is starting to reconcile retirement in his own mind.  I will hate to see Andy go, but I will support whatever decision he feels is best for him and his family.  He will always be a part of the Yankees family.  It was tough to see him pitch in Houston for three years, so hopefully, the Yankees organization will keep him in the fold with spring training coaching invitations, old-timers games, and other related functions. 

 

Until then, I’ll continue to enjoy watching Andy win for the Yankees.

 

 

Sipkin/News

 

Introducing the 2010 New York Yankees:

 

Catcher: Jorge Posada

First Base: Mark Teixeira

Shortstop: Derek Jeter

Third Base: Alex Rodriguez

Right Field: Nick Swisher

Center Field: Curtis Granderson

Left Field: Brett Gardner

DH: Nick Johnson

 

1st Starting Pitcher: CC Sabathia

2nd Starting Pitcher: A.J. Burnett

3rd Starting Pitcher: Andy Pettitte

4th Starting Pitcher: Javier Vazquez

5th Starting Pitcher: Phil Hughes

 

Closer: Mariano Rivera

 

Infield/Bench: Ramiro Pena

 

Outfield/Bench: Randy Winn

Outfield/Bench: Marcus Thames

 

Backup Catcher: Francisco Cervelli

 

Reliever: Joba Chamberlain

Reliever: Damaso Marte

Reliever: David Robertson

Reliever: Sergio Mitre

Reliever: Chan Ho Park

Reliever: Alfredo Aceves           

Reliever: Boone Logan

 

Is this the team that will propel the Yankees to their 28th World Championship?  Time will tell, but I like our chances.

 

 

 

 

I hate to date myself, but there are nine players on the Yankees 2010 roster that were born AFTER Don Mattingly had his major league debut with the Yankees in late 1982. 

 

 

 

 

Hey Julia, less than 48 hours until the first great Showdown of 2010!  Game on, my friend!  There will be a book headed your way!  J

 

 

 

 

Finally, I was saddened to hear the passing of former Baltimore Orioles pitching great Mike Cuellar.  Mike was only 72, and died today from stomach cancer in Florida.  He joined Jim Palmer, Dave McNally and Pat Dobson as the only foursome other than the 1920 Chicago White Sox (Red Faber, Lefty Williams, Eddie Cicotte and Dickie Kerr) to win 20 games each.  Ironically, of the four, only Palmer survives, as McNally and Dobson passed away in 2002 and 2006, respectively.  From 1969 through 1974, Mike won 20 games four times as the Orioles dominated the American League East.  He also pitched and won the deciding fifth game of the 1970 World Series, a 9-3 victory over the Cincinnati Reds. 

 

 

 

 

–Scott

 

 

 

 

Let’s Get Ready To Rumble!…

Less than a week until the Yankees travel to 4 Yawkey Way…

 

 


Fenway Park.JPG 

 

 

My nemesis last year was Julia of Julia’s Rants.  The season started so great for her as the Boston Red Sox took the first eight games of the season series against the Yankees.  For a time, it seemed as though the Yankees would never get a win.  But then along came August, and the tide turned.  Led by hip-rejuvenated Alex Rodriguez, the Yankees captured all but one of the remaining games in the series enroute to their 27th World Championship. 

 

 

AP 

 

There was hope that Julia and I could face one another in the ALCS but John Lackey and the Los Angeles Angels had other ideas.  Of course, after the season, Theo and the Red Sox decided that if you can’t beat him, sign him as they inked Lackey to a five-year deal to be their number 2 starter.  I know that Josh Beckett is the ace of the staff, but if I were building a franchise, I’d pass on Beckett and Lackey and go with Jon Lester. 

 

 

Barry Chin/Boston Globe

 

 

Still it was gratifying to beat Julia and to enjoy the success of a championship season (my seventh as a Yankees fan).  Conversely, I am 0-for-lifetime as a fan of the NFL’s Minnesota Vikings.  If only Brett Favre had just tucked the ball and ran…

 

 

Ronald Martinez/Getty Images

 

Here we are ready for a new season, and the battle between Julia and I gets off to a very early start.  I was listening to an interview with Boston beat writer Ian Browne and someone asked him if it was too early for Yankees-Red Sox.  His response was that it could be January 19th and a foot of snow on the ground and it wouldn’t be too early.  Precisely!  Granted, it’s your final record that determines whether you’ll see October, but the Yankees measure themselves against the Red Sox.  There is much more satisfaction in beating Boston than there is in beating, say, Kansas City.  The wins are measured the same, but still a win against the Royals just doesn’t have the same meaning.  I don’t want to offend my friends in Tampa because I know the Rays have the talent to win it all so this is not about disrespect.  However, the rivalry between the Rays and Yankees just isn’t as deep and heated as it is against the Red Sox.  There was a day that I despised the Baltimore Orioles like no other, so I am sure that the tide will eventually turn.  However, right now, as it has been for most of the past decade, baseball doesn’t get any better than Yankees-Red Sox.  As a Bay Area resident, I’ve been to Giants-Dodgers games, but they just don’t compare.

 

 

 

 

 

For our first wager, Julia and I have agreed to a book report assignment.  The winner gets to send a book of his/her choice (I know, the winner pays…go figure).  If the Yankees win, Julia gets to read and write a book report on the following book:

 

 

Dawn of a Dynasty: The Incredible and Improbable Story of the 1947 New York Yankees

 

Don’t click…this was just a cut and paste from Amazon.com!  The real thing will be making the trip to the Boston metro area to see my friend Julia!  I chose this book because it had special meaning to me.  1947 was the year that my late father graduated from high school, and it was the dawn of the great Yankees dynasty of the early 50’s.  If I could go back in time, 1927 would be my first choice so that I could watch the greatest Yankees team of all-time.  But for a second choice, given all of the great Yankees clubs in the past, 1947 would be next.  The team didn’t realize that it was on the verge of the greatest success in baseball history and it would have been fun to see the excitement and enthusiasm of those early years. 

 

Ted Williams and Joe DiMaggio - 1947 AL

AP

 

Yeah Joe, you can smile a little larger!  You’ll be getting over on that dude next to you!  :)

 

If I lose (c’mon, Carsten Charles Sabathia, don’t let me down!), I will have to read one of Julia’s favorites:

 

 

 

 

I like Julia’s essays, so I am pulling for my favorite MLB Blogger!  Go Julia!  Lose to the Yankees and write that book report!  As Rob Schneider would say, ‘C’mon, you CAN do it!’.  ;)

 

 

 

Courtesy:  Julia’s Rants

 

 

Congratulations to Ian Kennedy for being named to the starting rotation for the Arizona Diamondbacks.  I was very frustrated at times with Kennedy and his attitude when he was with the Yankees, but I do hope that he finds success.  It wasn’t that long ago when his name was mentioned in the same breath as Joba Chamberlain and Phil Hughes.  Also, hats off to the Detroit Tigers newly named starting center fielder Austin Jackson.  Don’t get me wrong, I enjoy seeing Curtis Granderson in center field for the Yankees.  But I will also wonder ‘what could have been’ with Ajax.  He made me a believer with the way he tattooed a home run a couple of years ago in spring training.  Granted, he is not a home run hitter, but he has that “it” quality people talk about. Having Johnny Damon as your personal mentor is not a bad thing so long as Damon doesn’t wear that freakin’ 2004 ring!  ;)

 

 

Andrew Mills/The Star Ledger/US Presswire

 

 

I was also glad to see Chad Gaudin land with the local Oakland A’s.  It is his second go-around with the A’s, and I think he’ll thrive in their bullpen.  I am only a BART trip away from the A’s Stadium, so I am sure that I’ll be there a time or two to see how he progresses in his return.

 

Getty Images

 

Is this really the last season of 24?  Wow, those were eight fast years!  On the bright side, you know that they can’t kill off Jack Bauer.  Not with the proposed movie deals in the works…

 

 


Jack Bauer.JPG 

 

 

How could Jesse James cheat on Sandra Bullock?  I don’t get it.  She is perhaps one of the most beautiful and inspirational actresses of my lifetime.

 

 


Sandy.JPG 

 

 

I know, I’m getting way off topic. Sorry.  I’ll close with saying that I am pulling for Crystal Bowersox on American Idol!  Go Crystal!  Keep up what you are doing.  You are special!

 

 


Crystal.JPG

Ladies and Gentlemen…would you please rise…

 

The end of an era…

 

Bob Sheppard tells MLB.com that he's officially calling it a career after over 50 years as the public address voice of the Yankees.

Simmons/NY Daily News

 

The “Voice of God” has finally called it a career.  Bob Sheppard, 99, announced earlier today that he was finally retiring since he no longer had the stamina needed to return to his job as the PA announcer at Yankee Stadium.  Sheppard was last heard “live” at the old Yankee Stadium in 2007.

 

 

 

Health issues have kept Sheppard from returning the last couple of years, and at his age, he finally decided that he’ll never be strong enough to resume his duties.  Paul Olden, who took over for Sheppard, will continue as the Yankees PA announcer.

 

 

Sheppard began his career at Yankee Stadium on April 17, 1951.  It’s amazing how many great Yankee players have heard their names called by Sheppard.  Sheppard’s first game was the final opening day game for Yankee great Joe DiMaggio.

 

 

 

I am very thankful that I was able to hear the great voice of Bob Sheppard at many Yankee games over the years.  Derek Jeter continues to play a recording of Sheppard’s voice at each at-bat, so his voice will continue to resonate throughout the new Yankee Stadium despite never having set foot there. 

 

Yankee Stadium Inaugural Game: 1st Yankee at bat Derek Jeter - Babe Ruth's bat by skyliner72. 

 

Bob Sheppard will always be remembered as one of the Yankee Legends.  I wish him much happiness and joy in his final years.

 

Bob Sheppard

 

Shelley Duncan has joined the rank of ex-Yankees.  He refused an assignment to AAA Scranton/Wilkes Barre after being dropped from the Yankees 40-man roster.  I would like to see a team give Duncan the opportunity to play at the major league level.  He has earned the right with his play and work ethic.

 

Caffalo/NY Daily News 

 

Happy Thanksgiving to all!

 


Happy Thanksgiving.JPG

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