Results tagged ‘ Bob Sheppard ’

Help Wanted: Pitching…

 

Have arm. Will travel…

 

 


Arm.JPG 

 

 

Well, not me, but the Yankees will be looking for some arms after this weekend’s injuries to A.J. Burnett and Andy Pettitte.  Burnett should not miss any time after his boneheaded stunt on Saturday.  He was frustrated about giving up three runs after two innings, and proceeded to take his frustration out on double doors in the clubhouse.  The doors won as Burnett cut both hands on plexiglass lineup holders affixed to the doors.  On Sunday, Andy Pettitte went the more honorable injury route as he was actually hurt while playing the game.  He strained his left groin throwing a pitch to Kelly Shoppach in the 3rd inning after giving up back to back singles. 

 

 

Pettitte Yankees groin injury Gene Monahan

Zach Ornitz/The Star Ledger

 

There were no long man in the bullpen on Sunday thanks to Burnett’s episode on Saturday which required extended use of both Dustin Moseley and Chad Gaudin.  So, the first guy out of the pen on Sunday was potential 8th inning set up man David Robertson.  The pieced-together pitching staff worked well as the Yankees overcame an early 3-0 deficit against American League All-Star starting pitcher David Price to win 9-5. 

 

 

New York Yankees vs Tampa Bay Rays at Yankee Stadium on July 18, 2010.

Zach Ornitz/The Star Ledger

 

 

The win gave the Yankees the series win against the Tampa Bay Rays, who had won Saturday’s game against Burnett, 10-5.

 

 

 

New York Yankees vs Tampa Bay Rays at Yankee Stadium on July 17, 2010.

Zach Ornitz/The Star Ledger

 

After the Yankees had won on Friday night in a thrilling 5-4 victory against the Rays on a night the team gave tribute to public address announcer Bob Sheppard and owner George Steinbrenner, I knew the Yankes would have a tough time on Saturday and Sunday facing Jeff Niemann and David Price.  But if I had expected a pitcher to falter, it would have been Niemann and not Price so clearly the Yankees were fortunate that Price chose Sunday to have his worst start of the season. 

 

Sergio Mitre, who is nearing return from the Disabled List, will slide into Pettitte’s spot in the rotation for the foreseeable future.  It is anticipated that Pettitte will be out for 4-5 weeks.  Even though Burnett should be able to make his next start, the Yankees need to be prepared for the worst-case scenario so I am sure that Joe Girardi will have Dustin Moseley and Chad Gaudin again waiting in the wings.  I remember Moseley most as one of the guys that the Los Angeles Angels turned to after the death of Nick Adenhart last season.  It would be good to see him excel in his opportunity with the Pinstripers. 

 

After the missed opportunity for Cliff Lee, I did not expect the Yankees to pursue a starting pitcher prior to the trading deadline.  However, I do wonder if that will change now that Pettitte is out for a month and Phil Hughes will be nearing his innings ceiling later in the year.  The names on the market do not excite me (not like Cliff Lee did).  Perhaps someone like Ted Lilly would be a good short term option, but he is hardly the front of the rotation starter that Lee would have been.  The only guy I’d love to see in Pinstripes, outside of Lee of course, would be Florida’s Josh Johnson but I really doubt the Marlins would trade him.

 

Alex Rodriguez hit his 598th home run on Sunday (off Andy Sonnanstine on Sunday in the 7th inning). 

 

 

New York Yankees vs Tampa Bay Rays at Yankee Stadium on July 18, 2010.

Zach Ornitz/The Star Ledger

 

The Yankees have a much-needed day off on Monday to recover from the events of the past week and the weekend tributes to two legendary men.  They’ll face the Los Angeles Angels beginning Tuesday in the Bronx as Hideki Matsui comes home to face his ex-teammates. 

 

 

 

Matsui.JPG

Kathy Willens/AP

 

 

In a game that George Steinbrenner had wanted to attend, the Yankees held their Annual Old-Timers Game on Saturday.  I have heard so many ex-player quotes about how well the Yankees and George in particular had treated the former Yankee players.  I hope the Steinbrenner Family keeps up the tradition with the same conviction and passion that George did.  I was saddened to hear that in addition to Steinbrenner, the Old-Timers Game was missing Yogi Berra who was hurt in a fall at his home.  The game is definitely not the same without #8 on the field so I look forward to his return next year.  For this year’s game, the Yankees celebrated the 1950 World Champions.  Like last year’s champions, the 1950 club defeated the Philadelphia Phillies to claim the championship. 

 

 

New York Yankees vs Tampa Bay Rays at Yankee Stadium on July 17, 2010.

Zach Ornitz/The Star Ledger

 

 

It is tough to see George Steinbrenner go, but it is time to move on.  I look forward to the leadership of Hal Steinbrenner, and the rest of the Steinbrenner children, and I hope they share their father’s passion and commitment to the success of the New York Yankees. 

 

 

The New York Times

 

–Scott

One for the Boss and Bob!…

 

It simply could not have been better scripted…

 

 

 

On a night when the Yankees paid tribute to owner George Steinbrenner and long-time public address announcer Bob Sheppard, Aura and Mystique were on full display as the Yankees rallied for a thrilling 5-4 victory over the Tampa Bay Rays.

 

 

Uli Seit/The New York Times

 

There is no doubt that somewhere high above, the Boss was smiling.  This game had it all…drama, intensity, great pitching and clutch hitting.  It was complete with one of A.J. Burnett’s pies at the end as Nick Swisher’s single drove home the winning run in the bottom of the 9th inning.

 

 

New York Yankees right fielder Nick Swisher (a.) welcomes the ceremonial pie in the face from pitcher A.J. Burnett after Swisher belts a game-winning RBI single in the bottom of the ninth.

Sipkin/NY Daily News

 

Swish, who just missed a home run in the bottom of the 5th, had tied the game in the 8th with his 16th home run of the season.  He also had a run-scoring single in the 3rd and is my easy choice for player of the game.

 

Tampa Bay starter James Shields was very effective early.  Aside from Swisher’s RBI single, the Yankees could not mount an offensive threat against Shields until later in the game.  When B.J. Upton caught Swisher’s fly ball at the top of the fence in the 5th, Shields was still in the 80’s in his pitch count.  It looked like he’d be able to coast through the 7th before turning over the game to the duo of Joaquin Benoit and Rafael Soriano.  Fortunately, Swisher’s near home run was a sign of things to come as Robinson Cano and Jorge Posada had back-to-back homers the next inning. 

 

The Rays temporarily recaptured the lead in the 7th, 5-4, before Swisher’s tying home run. 

 

In the 9th inning, after Mariano Rivera had retired the Rays in the top of the frame, leadoff batter Curtis Granderson reached on a line-drive single.  He was followed by Brett Gardner, who walked after a lengthy at bat.  It brought Derek Jeter to the plate, and I really hoped that it would be DJ to deliver the game-winning hit after his pre-game tribute.  Unfortunately, he struck out.  With one out and two on, Swisher came to the plate and promptly delivered his game-winning hit.  I immediately envisioned George Steinbrenner standing to applaud the thrilling win.  The day simply could not have had a better beginning, middle and end.  This one was clearly for the Boss…

 

 

Yankees honor George Steinbrenner and Bob Sheppard

John Munson/The Star Ledger

 

It was hard not to think back to August 6, 1979 when the Yankees faced the Baltimore Orioles after attending Thurman Munson’s funeral earlier in the day.  The game was highlighted by a dramatic three-run, bottom of the 9th, home run by the late Bobby Murcer, as the Yankees won by the same score as tonight, 5-4.  I can’t say that tonight’s game had the same numbness I felt after Thurman’s death, but the impact was just the same. 

 

 

AP

 

I realize that Hal Steinbrenner has been running the Yankees for several years, however, the Hal Steinbrenner Era is officially underway, and he is off to an undefeated start.  His father would be very proud…

 

 

 AP

 

 

This was George Steinbrenner’s Night, and it was Bob Sheppard’s Night.  They will be forever engrained into the fabric of Yankee Stadium, and are now part of the Aura and Mystique.  Goodnight, Gentleman, we will miss you…

 

 

Yankees honor George Steinbrenner and Bob Sheppard

John Munson/The Star Ledger

 

–Scott

Your Attention Please…A Yankee Great Remembered…

The “Voice of God” has been silenced…



Bob Sheppard Yankees

Chris Faytok/The Star Ledger

 


The voice of Yankees Stadium, Bob Sheppard, has
passed away at the age of 99.  Sheppard’s
health did not allow him to handle the PA duties at the new Yankee Stadium, so
he will forever be linked as a part of the old Yankee Stadium which ended its
run following the 2008 season. 
Sheppard’s last game was September 17, 2007.

 

Paul Olden has been the PA announcer since the team
opened the new Yankee Stadium in 2009, however, Derek Jeter has continued to
use a recorded tape of Sheppard’s voice to announce his plate appearances.  He’ll continue the practice even though
Sheppard has departed.

 

I am glad that I had the numerous opportunities to
hear Sheppard’s voice at the old Stadium. 
He will always be a huge part of Yankees history, and his voice will
live on.

 

It’s incredible to think of the players that
Sheppard announced over the course of his career.  His first game was April 17, 1951, which,
ironically, was also Mickey Mantle’s first game.  Here is the box score from the game:

 

April 17, 1951 at Yankee Stadium

New York Yankees 5, Boston Red Sox 0

Red Sox

AB

R

H

RBI

Dom DiMaggio, cf

3

0

2

0

Billy Goodman, rf

3

0

1

0

Ted Williams, lf

3

0

1

0

Vern Stephens, 3b

4

0

0

0

Walt Dropo, 1b

4

0

1

0

Bobby Doerr, 2b

4

0

0

0

Lou Boudreau, ss

4

0

1

0

Buddy Rosar, c

2

0

0

0

Bill Wight, p

2

0

0

0

   Ellis
Kinder, p

0

0

0

0

   Charlie
Maxwell, p

1

0

0

0

   Mickey
McDermott, p

0

0

0

0

Totals

30

0

6

0

 

Yankees

AB

R

H

RBI

Jackie Jensen, lf

4

2

2

2

Phil Rizzuto, ss

3

1

0

0

Mickey Mantle, rf

4

1

1

1

Joe DiMaggio, cf

4

0

1

1

Yogi Berra, c

2

0

1

1

Johnny Mize, 1b

3

0

0

0

   Joe
Collins, 1b

0

0

0

0

Billy Johnson, 3b

2

0

0

0

Jerry Coleman, 2b

3

1

2

0

Vic Raschi, p

2

0

0

0

Totals

27

5

7

5

 

Boston Red Sox

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

0

0

0

-

 

0

New York Yankees

0

0

2

 

0

0

3

 

0

0

x

-

 

5

 

E-Boudreau (1). 
DP-Boston 2 (Wight-Boudreau-Dropo, Boudreau-Doerr-Dropo), New York 3 (DiMaggio-Mize,
Rizzuto-Coleman-Mize, Rizzuto-Coleman-Collins).  2B-NY Jensen (1, off Wight).  HR-NY Jensen (1, 3rd inning off
Wight, 1 on 1 out).  Team LOB-7.  SH-Raschi (1, off Wight), Rizzuto (1, off
Wight).  Team-2.  U-HP-Bill McGowan, 1B-Bill McKinley, 2B-Jim
Honochick, 3B-Hank Soar.  T-2:12.  A-44,860.

 

Red Sox

IP

H

R

ER

BB

SO

Bill Wight (L, 0-1)

5.0

7

5

5

2

1

Ellis Kinder

1.0

0

0

0

0

0

Mickey McDermott

2.0

0

0

0

0

1

Totals

8.0

7

5

5

2

2

 

Yankees

IP

H

R

ER

BB

SO

Vic Raschi (W, 1-0)

9.0

6

0

0

4

6

Totals

9.0

6

0

0

4

6


For Bob Sheppard’s final game, the Yankees won
again to bookend his legendary career with wins.

 

September 17, 2007 at Yankee Stadium

New York Yankees 8, Baltimore Orioles 5

Orioles

AB

R

H

RBI

Brian Roberts, 2b

4

2

2

0

Tike Redman, cf

5

1

2

1

Nick Markakis, rf

5

1

2

3

Miguel Tejada, ss

2

0

0

0

   Luis
Hernandez, ph

1

0

0

0

Kevin Millar, 1b

5

0

3

0

Aubrey Huff, dh

4

0

1

1

Melvin Mora, 3b

5

0

1

0

Ramon Hernandez, c

4

0

1

0

Jay Payton, lf

4

1

1

0

   Brandon
Fahey, lf

0

0

0

0

Totals

39

5

13

5

 

Yankees

AB

R

H

RBI

Johnny Damon, cf

4

0

0

0

Derek Jeter, ss

5

1

2

0

Bobby Abreu, rf

5

0

2

2

Alex Rodriguez, 3b

3

0

1

1

Hideki Matsui, lf

5

1

1

1

Jorge Posada, c

5

1

3

0

Jason Giambi, dh

1

2

0

0

   Shelley
Duncan, pr-dh

0

0

0

0

Robinson Cano, 2b

4

1

2

1

Doug Mientkiewicz, 1b

1

1

1

2

Totals

33

8

13

8

 

Baltimore Orioles

2

0

0

 

0

0

0

 

1

0

2

-

 

5

New York Yankees

0

2

1

 

2

0

2

 

0

1

x

-

 

8

 

2B-Roberts (41, off Hughes), Markakis (41, off
Hughes), Millar (25, off Hughes), Payton (21, off Ramirez), Huff (31, off
Rivera), Cano (37, off Cabrera), Abreu (36, off Hoey), Jeter (33, off
Birkins).  HR-Matsui (24, 3rd
inning off Cabrera, 0 on 2 out). 
RBI-Markakis 3 (103), Redman (13), Huff (69), Mientkiewicz 2 (18),
Matsui (95), Cano (85), Damon (59), Abreu 2 (98), Rodriguez (142).  S-Mientkiewicz.  SF-Rodriguez.  LOB-Balt 11, NYY 12.  SB-Redman (5).  DP-NYY 1 ( Cano-Mientkiewicz).  U-HP-Jeff Kellogg, 1B-Eric Cooper, 2B-Andy
Fletcher, 3B-Mike Reilly.  T-3:54.  A-52,548.

 

Orioles

IP

H

R

ER

BB

SO

Daniel Cabrera (L, 9-18)

5.0

8

6

6

3

5

Jim Hoey

1.1

2

1

1

1

1

Kurt Birkins

1.1

3

1

1

3

1

Radhames Liz

0.1

0

0

0

0

0

Totals

8.0

13

8

8

7

7

 

Yankees

IP

H

R

ER

BB

SO

Phil Hughes (W, 5-3)

5.2

6

2

2

2

3

Edwar Ramirez (H, 3)

1.0

3

1

1

0

1

Luis Vizcaino (H, 13)

1.1

1

0

0

0

2

Kyle Farnsworth

0.2

2

2

2

1

0

Mariano Rivera (S, 30)

0.1

1

0

0

0

1

Totals

9.0

13

5

5

3

7

 


So long, Bob Sheppard.  Joltin’ Joe and the Mick are waiting for you
to announce their next game…

 

Hoff/NY Daily News



Saturday night, the Yankees lost a
heart-breaker.  On a night, when Cliff
Lee gave up 6 earned runs in the Baltimore Orioles’ pounding of the Texas
Rangers, 6-1, the man who was mentioned as the likely odd man out had the
Lee-to-the-Yankees trade been successful was stellar.  Javier Vazquez, who probably would have been
dealt to a National League club, went 7 innings and have up only 3 hits and no
runs.  He struck out 7 batters, while
only walking 2.  He left with a 1-0 lead,
however, his replacement, Joba Chamberlain promptly allowed a couple of hits, a
wild pitch, and an intentional pass to load the bases in the bottom of the 8th
for Jose Lopez.  Showing that the Yankees
bullpen is a much greater need for GM Brian Cashman than starting pitching,
Lopez delivered Chamberlain’s offering into the seats for a grand slam.   The Yankees tried to rally in the top of the
9th but they couldn’t come through. 
So, what should have been an awesome night for Vazquez turned into yet
another disappointing Joba performance. 



Joba Chamberlain Yankees Oakland cropped file

Kyle Terada/US Presswire

 


Fortunately, the team rebounded on Sunday to win
big, 8-2, behind CC Sabathia.  It was CC’s
12th win of the season (12-3) which matches Tampa’s David Price for
the league lead.  Sunday saw the Big 3 of
the AL East win (New York, Tampa and Boston), but the Yankees (56-32) hold a two-game
edge over the Rays.  The Red Sox are 5
games back.  I was glad to see the
Yankees end the first half on a positive note, particularly after Saturday’s
tough loss.  The second half starts off
as intensely as the first half when the Yankees welcome the Tampa Bay Rays to
Yankee Stadium on Friday night.  But for
a now, a few days off (well, at least for only about ‘half’ the team!). 



 


Well, it is time for my final “forced” spotlight on
a Boston Red Sox player (thanks to a wager loss to Julia of Julia’s
Rants
).  I thought about a paragraph for
Dice-K or John Lackey or Adrian Beltre or Victor Martinez, but I decided to go
with a player that will be a fixture in the Red Sox rotation for years to come…


 

#11      Clay
Buchholz

 


Charles Krupa/AP



Clay burst onto the major league scene in 2007 with
a no-hitter in just his second major league start.  On September 1, 2007, against the Baltimore
Orioles, he became the first Red Sox rookie to throw a no-hitter and just the
third major league pitcher to throw a no-hitter in his first and second start
since 1900. 



Boston Red Sox pitcher Clay Buchholz was hoisted up by catcher Jason Varitek after Buchholz pitched a no-hitter against the Baltimore Orioles at Fenway Park last night, putting the perfect touch on a 10-0 victory.

Winslow Townson/AP

 

He was born in Lumberton, Texas, on August 14, 1984,
so he’ll just be 26 when his birthday rolls around next month.

 

Clay was drafted in 2005 as a supplement pick
received as compensation for the loss of free agent pitcher Pedro
Martinez.  I guess Pedro truly was the
gift that keeps on giving to the RSN. 

 

He made his first start against the Los Angeles
Angels on August 17, 2007, and picked up the win in the Red Sox victory. 

 

His stay in the majors would be interrupted by
injury and several trips to the minors for the next couple of yeas.  He started 2009 at Pawtucket, and came up in
July and won a total of 7 games through the duration of the year. 

 

In 2010, he picked up where he left off, and was,
for a time, the leading Red Sox pitcher with 10 wins (10-4, 2.47 ERA).  He injured his hamstring running the bases in
San Francisco in late June that led to a trip to the Disabled List, but he is
expected to start in Boston’s first series following the All-Star Break.  He and Jon Lester form a very deadly duo in
the Red Sox rotation, and both should be stalwarts in the rotation for a very
long time. 

 

Here is Clay’s scouting report from
SoxProspects.com:

 

Scouting Report: Buchholz has a low-to-mid-90s four-seam fastball, a two-seam
fastball with decent movement, a slider, a hard 12-to-6 curveball, and a
changeup. His fastball typically sits around 91-94 mph, topping out at about 97
mph. However, he let loose at the end of the 2006 season, and his fastball sat
around 96 mph. His plus changeup is generally a straight change that sits
around 78-82 mph; he also throws a circle change.  His curveball, the best
in the organization, sits between 76-81 mph with a knee-buckling bite.  On
any given night, Buchholz’s curve or change can be unhittable, and he tends to
rely on whichever one is on as his out pitch throughout the game.  His
slider, while average to above average, is a bit behind his other secondary
pitches and sits in the low-to-mid-80s.  Mixes in all of his pitches
phenomenally.  Good demeanor on the mound.  Pitches well under
pressure, pitching coaches have said he has ice water running through his
veins.  Nice pick-off move.  He has struggled with consistency early
in his big-league career, but otherwise has ace makeup. Might need to add and
maintain some weight to endure a full major league season. In September
2007, in just his second career major league start, Buchholz threw a no-hitter
against the Baltimore Orioles.   In 2008, he had major struggles with
command and confidence, leading to lackluster results. Returned to form in 2009.

 

Clay’s name has been mentioned in the past with
possible trades for the likes of Roy Halladay and Adrian Gonzalez.  With consistency and good heath, Clay should
make himself ‘untouchable’ and I have no doubt he’ll reach his potential as a
future ace for the Red Sox.    



AP


Julia, with that, I am done!  :)


–Scott

Ladies and Gentlemen…would you please rise…

 

The end of an era…

 

Bob Sheppard tells MLB.com that he's officially calling it a career after over 50 years as the public address voice of the Yankees.

Simmons/NY Daily News

 

The “Voice of God” has finally called it a career.  Bob Sheppard, 99, announced earlier today that he was finally retiring since he no longer had the stamina needed to return to his job as the PA announcer at Yankee Stadium.  Sheppard was last heard “live” at the old Yankee Stadium in 2007.

 

 

 

Health issues have kept Sheppard from returning the last couple of years, and at his age, he finally decided that he’ll never be strong enough to resume his duties.  Paul Olden, who took over for Sheppard, will continue as the Yankees PA announcer.

 

 

Sheppard began his career at Yankee Stadium on April 17, 1951.  It’s amazing how many great Yankee players have heard their names called by Sheppard.  Sheppard’s first game was the final opening day game for Yankee great Joe DiMaggio.

 

 

 

I am very thankful that I was able to hear the great voice of Bob Sheppard at many Yankee games over the years.  Derek Jeter continues to play a recording of Sheppard’s voice at each at-bat, so his voice will continue to resonate throughout the new Yankee Stadium despite never having set foot there. 

 

Yankee Stadium Inaugural Game: 1st Yankee at bat Derek Jeter - Babe Ruth's bat by skyliner72. 

 

Bob Sheppard will always be remembered as one of the Yankee Legends.  I wish him much happiness and joy in his final years.

 

Bob Sheppard

 

Shelley Duncan has joined the rank of ex-Yankees.  He refused an assignment to AAA Scranton/Wilkes Barre after being dropped from the Yankees 40-man roster.  I would like to see a team give Duncan the opportunity to play at the major league level.  He has earned the right with his play and work ethic.

 

Caffalo/NY Daily News 

 

Happy Thanksgiving to all!

 


Happy Thanksgiving.JPG

Turn the Heat Up…

Well, after the Yankees’ 6-3 win over the Cincinnati Reds in their final Grapefruit League road game, I owe an apology to Joba Chamberlain for the wiffle ball comment that I made in my last blog.  

 

Joba sparkled yesterday, going 5 1/3 innings and allowing 5 hits, 2 runs, and 2 walks.  He struck out 6.  But the greater stat, in my perspective, was the increased velocity on his pitches (speeds of up to 96 mph). 

 

Noah K. Murray/The Star Ledger

 

Both Joba and Andy Pettitte have shown that the back end of the rotation is just fine. 

 

I have seen reports that A.J. Burnett has proven to be a good mentor for Joba this spring.  I am glad to see A.J. take the leadership responsibility, and I think he has much wisdom to offer based on his own experiences as he has learned to become a true pitcher instead of just a hard thrower.  

 

Joba is in Lancaster County, Nebraska today for his arraignment on last fall’s drunken-driving charge.  One thing’s for sure, Joba will hold only himself accountable and he can be depended upon to make the best of a bad situation.  He’s a ‘stand up’ guy, and that’s certainly one quality that has earned my respect.  

 

THE NEW YANKEE STADIUM WON’T BE “OFFICIAL” UNTIL…

 

Until these familiar words flow through the loudspeakers, the new Yankee Stadium cannot be truly christened…

 

“Good evening…ladies and gentlemen…and welcome…to Yankee Stadium”

 

 

Newsday

 

Unfortunately, long-time Yankees public-address announcer Bob Sheppard, who is in his late 90’s, will miss the exhibition games with the Chicago Cubs on April 3rd and 4th, and Opening Day on April 16th against the Cleveland Indians.  

 

He is still recovering from the bronchial infection that sidelined him for most of last season.  His wife indicated that he does not currently have the necessary stamina and was advised against working by his physician.  She stated that a warmer mid-season return was more likely.  Until then, Paul Olden will handle the duties. 

 

It is hard to believe that Sheppard has been the public-address announcer since 1951.  His first game was April 17, 1951.  The Yankees defeated the Boston Red Sox, 4-0, that day.  The combined lineups featured seven Hall of Famers:  Joe DiMaggio, Mickey Mantle, Johnny Mize, Yogi Berra, Phil Rizzuto, Ted Williams, and Lou Boudreau.  It was also Mickey’s first game (he went 1-for-4), and the beginning of the Yankee Clipper’s final season.  

 

Here’s hoping for a full recovery and a triumphant return to the new Stadium by Mr. Sheppard…

 

 

ODDS & ENDS…

 

Jonathan Albaladejo has made the final Yankees roster, which means that Brett Tomko, Alfredo Aceves, and Dan Giese are headed for Scranton.  Tomko was very disappointed as he felt that he had pitched well enough to make the roster.  True, but Joe Girardi obviously feels that the club is stronger with Albaladejo.  

 

Kathy Willens/AP

 

The last roster decision is the infield utility role, which has become a competitive battle between Angel Berroa and Ramiro Pena.  Unless the Yankees decide to go outside of the organization for a last-minute choice, I fully expect Pena to be announced as the victor.  But the #90 jersey has to go!  Just kidding.  I know that he’ll be re-assigned a more “reasonable” number if he makes the roster.  

 

I was glad to see that former Yankee Nick Green has won Boston’s infield utility role (well, at least until Julio Lugo returns).  

 

 

I was surprised by the Detroit Tigers decision to release Gary Sheffield.  The Phillies were almost immediately mentioned as a possible destination, but Sheffield is better suited for the American League as a designated hitter.  The Rays have also been mentioned.  Considering that his next home run will be number 500, there should be some good early season drama.  That’s okay, but can we put Sheffield on mute?…

 

Mike Carlson/AP

 

Warning:  I am getting ready to make some non-baseball related comments so please feel free to bail from this blog…

 

What took John Calipari so long to say yes to the University of Kentucky’s $31.65 million offer to become head coach of the school’s basketball team?  Geesh!  $32 mil at one of the most prestigious basketball programs in the country.  What’s to think about?…

 

Minnesota Vikings head coach Brad Childress is really scaring me now.  He has made comments that he is satisfied with the current quarterbacks on the roster (primarily Tavaris Jackson and Sage Rosenfels).  Fine, but calling Sage “a younger Gus Frerotte” is not a good thing!  No offense to Gus, but c’mon…we need more than the next Gus Frerotte.  The Vikings have shown no interest in Denver Broncos quarterback Jay Cutler, but of course, you never know if that’s truly because there is legitimately no interest or if it is simply posturing in the event of a trade so that the team doesn’t appear to be desperate.  Now that the Broncos have indicated they will trade Cutler after an inability to communicate with him for 10 days, it will be interesting to see what transpires.  I am not saying the Vikings need to pull the trigger, but they need to get in the game…

 

Have a happy April Fool’s Day, everyone!

 

  

 

–Scott

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.