Results tagged ‘ A-Fraud ’

An Interesting Day…

Where do we go from here?…

December 6th.  For years, this has been the anniversary of my graduation from Air Force Basic Training at Lackland AFB in San Antonio, Texas.  But on December 6, 2013, it may have been the most tumultuous day in Yankees history in terms of arrivals and departures…or at least in recent memory. 

The day started with news that talks had broken down between Robinson Cano and the Seattle Mariners.  It stirred renewed hope that Cano would find his way back to the Bronx, but as quickly as the reports had come about the Mariners’ CEO blowing a gasket at salary demands from the Cano Camp and ending talks, the reports came that Cano had accepted a ten year deal from the Mariners for $240 million.  Cano never called the Yankees before taking the offer, but it was a given they would not match. 

It’s hard to watch your team’s best player walk away for nothing.  But in this situation, I think the Yankees made the right call.  After the fiasco of the Alex Rodriguez contract and what an albatross it has become, it is clear that extended contracts are not good for baseball.  I saw one writer yesterday who wrote that the only player worth a ten year deal, right now, would be 22-year-old Los Angeles Angels outfielder Mike Trout.  I think that’s a fairly accurate statement.

When the Yankees signed CC Sabathia and Mark Teixeira to long-term deals in 2009, both of those players were significantly better players than they are today.  They can continue to perform at a high level but at this point, it is equally possible for them to continue performance regression. 

I can remember how painful Jason Giambi’s had become by the end.  Even David Winfield’s ten year contract, regardless of how great the player was, had been a mistake as the player and the owner were bitter enemies by the time the contract expired. 

I thought the Yankees’ offer of 7 years for $175 million was fair.  If the Cano Camp (Team Jay Z or rather, CAA) had been more sensible in their meetings with the Yankees, I am sure that Cano probably could have squeezed out an additional year.  However, Cano was dead set on getting a ten year contract, so that clearly nailed the coffin on his Yankees career.  Of the two organizations, the Yankees and the Mariners, I feel strongly that the former would be more willing to take care of Cano at the end of the contract.  In other words, at the end of 7 years, if the player was continuing to play at a high level, the Yankees would pay a new contract commensurate to performance with a premium paid for past accomplishments such as they’ve done with Derek Jeter.  I know the Jeter negotiations were very tense a couple of years ago but this off-season’s re-signing was at a higher dollar amount than any other team would have paid.  As for the Mariners, I highly doubt that Cano will be in Seattle at the end of the ten years.  When he begins the eventual downward trend as he ages, Seattle will be looking to move the contract, even if they have to pay cash, to cut their losses.  The odds that Cano would have been in New York at the end of 7 years would have been substantially greater. 

I am not sure that Cano has fully comprehended how he has trashed his Yankee legacy.  I personally have no desire to ever see the player honored in Memorial Park and have absolutely no qualms with the team re-issuing #24 to another player.  Maybe time will heal the feelings, but Cano showed no loyalty or respect for the fans of New York and simply took the money and ran. He was a good Yankee, but he was not a great one.  For a player who enjoyed being a star in New York City, it will be interesting to see how he adapts to being out of the spotlight.  The crowds attending Seattle away games will be smaller and will have far fewer “home team” fans in attendance.  With the Yankees, it’s like being a rock star as Jason Giambi once said.  Nothing against Seattle, it is a beautiful city and a great ballpark, but it is a team that is, and will continue to be, inferior to the much stronger Los Angeles Angels, Texas Rangers, and Oakland A’s.  They do not have a history and tradition of winning and I do not expect that to change.  Cano has his money.  Good for him.  But his days of playing for an organization that wants to win every year and considers missing the play-offs to be a disaster are over.

With Friday’s flurry of activity, it was almost an afterthought that the Yankees also lost outfielder Curtis Granderson.  Grandy has a good player for most of his Yankees career, but of course, he missed the majority of the 2013 season due to injuries.  He leaves the Yankees for a tougher park to hit with the New York Mets.  Maybe his game will play well for the Mets, or maybe he becomes the next Jason Bay.  The Yankees did not show a strong desire for Grandy’s return after he rejected the team’s qualifying offer and had more preference for guys like Jacoby Ellsbury, Carlos Beltran, Shin-Soo Choo, or even the Dodgers’ Matt Kemp.  At the moment, with the signings of Jacoby Ellsbury and Carlos Beltran, there wouldn’t have been any room in the crowded outfield for Granderson.  While the Yankees have stated they intend to keep Brett Gardner and move him to left field (pushing Alfonso Soriano to DH), I still suspect that Gardner will be expendable in the team’s pursuit of quality starting pitching.  I see the DH role being better utilized for guys like Derek Jeter and Brian McCann as ways to rest them than moving the admittedly defensively challenged Soriano there on a full-time basis.  My feelings about Granderson’s departure are significantly different than those of Cano.  I felt that Granderson made the best decision for him both personally and professionally.  I am thankful he was a Yankee and I wish him well with his new team.  I am sure that he has a few more productive years ahead of him.

Friday also saw the return of starting pitcher Hiroki Kuroda and the addition of outfielder Carlos Beltran.  It’s apparent that Beltran’s arrival is tied to Cano’s departure since the team finally acquiesced to Beltran’s desire for a third year, but both signings are essential for the 2014 Yankees.  With only CC Sabathia and Ivan Nova holding down spots in the starting rotation, Kuroda is a key anchor for the rotation.  He may be no more than a #3 starter next year, but he is a strong stabilizing force.  The Yankees still need more starting pitching besides the hope that Michael Pineda and/or some of the Triple A arms will be able to take spots.

I really was unsure if Kuroda would return.  It has been said that he wants to play a final year in Japan before he retires, and there was talk that he might be interested in returning to Southern California since his family still lives there.  But Kuroda is an honorable man, and it was so telling in his final year with the Los Angeles Dodgers when he didn’t want to be traded because the Dodgers were the team he started the season with and he didn’t want to go elsewhere.  I did wonder if the pull off the Dodgers, assuming they were interested, would have been too much.  But I think Kuroda has enjoyed playing for the Yankees and his sense of loyalty led him back to the team for one more year.  It’s a pleasure to have him back in the fold.

Welcome to the Bronx, Carlos Beltran!  Granted, the Yankees have more to do if they want to return to October baseball, but Beltran is one of the post-season greats.  Some guys thrive when the pressure is on (unlike Alex Rodriguez) and Beltran is a leader in that category.  It has always been said that he wanted to play in the Bronx and had been willing to sign for a discount when he ultimately signed with the Mets.  He finally gets the chance at the latter stages of his career.  He is an offensive upgrade over Ichiro Suzuki and Vernon Wells, and helps to offset the loss of Cano’s production. 

It is interesting that the 2014 Yankee outfield will be comprised of two guys who played for the opposing teams in the 2013 World Series.  One with a ring and one without.  At the moment, they’ll be joined in the outfield by Brett Gardner and Alfonso Soriano although, as previously stated above, I think Gardner will be moved for pitching help. 

December 6th will long be remembered as the day the Yankees lost Robinson Cano and Curtis Granderson, but brought in Hiroki Kuroda and Carlos Beltran.  There is much work yet to do with Cano’s loss, but the arrivals of Beltran, Brian McCann, and Jacoby Ellsbury bring guys with something to prove.  Kelly Johnson is also a Yankee and the starting second baseman at the moment, although I do think he’ll be the super-sub by the time the team breaks camp next spring.  I do not know who will be the second baseman in 2014 but the Yankees will figure it out.  As David Robertson said, they always do. 

From Beantown to the Bronx…

I have heard many Yankee fans voice frustration about Jacoby Ellsbury’s contract (primarily the length, not the dollars).  I know that he has had his health challenges, but I like the move.  I respected Ellsbury during his days in Boston and I like the elements of his game.  It can be argued that he is Brett Gardner, but he is a better version.  As a player who once said that he’d never play for the Yankees, it is nice to see that the history and tradition of the organization were overriding factors, in addition to the monetary reasons.  The Red Sox weren’t going to extend the years to Ellsbury so it was inevitable that he’d leave.  There is a sting with the Red Sox Nation that he went with the Yankees, and there are probably parallels to the Cano situation (dollars over loyalty), but at the end of the day, I am glad that Ells is a Yank. 

And then there’s next week…

As the baseball winter meetings loom on the immediate horizon, there should be more activity for Yankees fans.  This winter is so dramatically different than last year’s status quo approach.  After missing the play-offs and the retirement of a few players, there were more holes to fill.  Brian McCann solidifies the catching position, and Francisco Cervelli will return, after now that he’s completed his 50-game suspension and is healthy, to be McCann’s caddy.  McCann gives the Yankees a better catcher than they had in 2012 starter, Russell Martin, and the strongest offensive threat at the position since the retired Jorge Posada. 

Jacoby Ellsbury gives the Yankees options.  He strengthens the team up the middle, and like McCann, has a swing that tailored for Yankee Stadium.  He may not hit a lot of home runs, but he’ll be a terror on the bases.  His presence, despite what the team says publicly, makes Brett Gardner expendable.  For a team with weak prospects at the upper levels, it will take a Brett Gardner to bring a quality return.  The Yankees need better starting pitching, a second baseman, and some help in the bullpen.  They also need to cover for the expected absence of the Loser, Alex Rodriguez.  So, if there are any certainties, it is that the Yankees will be active next week.  I am sure that the website, MLB Trade Rumors, will be busier than Grand Central Station over the holidays.

Ala The Walking Dead, let’s say goodbye to those that we’ve lost…

  • Robinson Cano, Seattle Mariners
  • Curtis Granderson, New York Mets
  • Phil Hughes, Minnesota Twins
  • Chris Stewart, Pittsburgh Pirates
  • Mike Harkey, bullpen coach, now pitching coach, Arizona Diamondbacks

Thanks for the memories, but rest assured, we’ll be okay. 

Go Yankees!

–Scott

 

Parting is such sweet sorrow…

I was never a fan of good-byes…

Sadly, the 2013 Major League Baseball Season has come to an end.  Well, at least for the New York Yankees.  It was an eventful final week that saw a farewell to the great Mariano Rivera that was unmatched by any I have seen in recent years or even during my lifetime.  Mo’s final game at Yankee Stadium turned out to be the final game of his professional career as he chose not to pitch during the season-ending series in Houston to preserve his Bronx goodbye as the final exit for a storied and soon to be Hall of Fame career.

I have been a Mariano Rivera fan since the days when he set up John Wetteland in the bullpen.  His 7th and 8th inning appearances before the cardiac appearances by Wetteland were electric.  The ball seemed to come screaming with blazing speed yet Mo seemed so effortless in letting the ball leave his hand.  He made it look easy, and for the length of his career, he proved he was just a little better than everyone else.  Sure, there were a few hiccups along the way.  A couple of key blown saves in critical games, but these were few and far between.  His success rate was far superior to any failures, and in those failures, you knew that Mo had left his all.

Looking back, I certainly have no regrets.  It was an honor and privilege to be a Yankees fan and to witness the career of the latest Yankees legend.  He’ll be someone that my grandchildren will be talking about, and I can say that I saw him pitch from the beginning to the end.  Mo showed how special it was to play for one team, and he is forever embedded into Yankees lore.  Ichiro Suzuki will be immortalized in Cooperstown one day as a Seattle Mariner, but Seattle will never be able to call Ichiro exclusively their own.  They may have had his best years, but he still is playing his final years as a Yankee, not a Mariner.  Fortunately, we never had to see Mo in another uniform or his former catcher, Jorge Posada.

I have been a Yankees fan since 1974 when free agent Jim “Catfish” Hunter, then my favorite pitcher, signed with the Yankees.  I had grown up very intrigued by the Yankees with their great history and tradition.  Those early 70’s were still a tough time for the Yankees organization, but they were about to turn the corner following the acquisition of the team by George Steinbrenner and his partners.  To digress, I always loved the quote “There is nothing in life quite so limited as being a limited partner of George Steinbrenner”.   This quote is attributed to former Yankees minority owner and later Houston Astros owner John McMullen.  The first baseball biography I recall reading when I was little was a book about Lou Gehrig, and I’ve been a fan of his ever since.  So, when Catfish made the decision to join the Yankees, it was very easy for me to follow.

During the course of my Yankees fandom, I’ve considered the following players to be my favorite Yankees.  Hunter, Thurman Munson, Rich “Goose” Gossage, Don Mattingly, and Mariano Rivera.  All those years and I can still count my favorite active Yankees on one hand, well until today with Rivera’s retirement.  That doesn’t mean I don’t respect other Yankees over the years, these guys just happened to be my personal favorites at the time they played.

Being someone who appreciates history and tradition, I’ve always felt that Rivera was the perfect man to take Jackie Robinson’s number to retirement for the final time.  Mo proved that he had the character to stand with greatness, and he served the legacy of Jackie Robinson very proudly and understood its significance.  I am glad that the last guy out of baseball with #42 wasn’t some thug just trying to hang on to a lost career, with rumors of a steroid past.  He wears #13.  Okay, sorry, I didn’t mean that, or maybe I did, but you get the point.  Jackie Robinson was a great man who dealt with more adversity than any of us will ever knew.  He did it while turning the other cheek and proving he was the better man.  He did this while carving out a Hall of Fame career on the field.  If there was a man who deserved to have his number retired across baseball, it was Robinson, and if there was a man who deserved to be the final one to walk off the field with it, it was Mo.  The Baseball Gods made sure this one played out like it was supposed to.

Mo, we thank you for simply being you.  You did it your way, and you never strived to be anything other than what you were.  You proved better than most in shaking off the game’s failures and you never gloated in its successes.  You were proud of your teammates and respectful of your opponents.  Baseball needs you, and I hope that this is just the beginning as you move into the next phase of your career.  I am proud, very proud, when I say that I am a Mariano Rivera fan.  He exceeded my wildest expectations and he leaves as the best ever at his position.  He deserves to be a first ballot entry to the Hall of Fame.  Anything less is unacceptable.  He was ours and he proved he belongs to the Hall like no other that I’ve personally witnessed during my lifetime.  Farewell, Mo.  This is not the end, but simply the closing of one chapter and the opening of the next.

 

Mariano Rivera

 

AP Photo (courtesy of LoHud Yankees Blog)

The gaze from under the brim of his cat…

While the focus of this post is Rivera, I would be remiss for not saying thanks to Andy Pettitte.  Time and again, he stopped losing streaks and he was clutch when it mattered most (October).  He never had the brilliant stuff of Felix Hernandez or Roy Halladay, but he was a winner.  His passion showed and he was a champion.  It was tough watching him leave via free agency for those three years in Houston, but I am glad he came back.  Even during his time in Houston, you’d hear stories about how Andy still followed the Yankees.  He is part of the Yankees family and history and always will be.  It was so very fitting that his final game was a complete game win in his hometown of Houston.  A bit ironic that the opponent was named Clemens (Paul Clemens, no relation to Roger).  For the final game of the season, Roger Clemens did make an appearance to wish farewell to Mariano, and he gave Andy a hug.  There has been a lot of mudslinging between the former close friends and regardless of what Roger may have or have not done, I was glad to see the small reconciliation.  Baseball is greater than any one of us, and at the end of the day, Clemens, Pettitte, and Rivera were teammates and they represented the our team.  I fully expect to see all three at future Old Timer’s Day games and I am hopeful that old scars can be healed and that the game itself can move forward.

Back to Andy, he will be a hard act to follow.  When you look at the Yankees pitching staff, there is not one that can match Andy’s heart.  CC Sabathia appears to be on the downside of his career, Hiroki Kuroda could very well head to Japan for his final season or two, Phil Hughes has worn the pinstripes for the last time, Ivan Nova is a roller-coaster and the jury is still out on David Huff.  Next season will be one of transition and it is unfortunate that we’ll no longer have Andy as an anchor to the rotation.  Andy’s ceiling was never as a #1 pitcher.  He came to the major leagues with question marks, but he left as one of its greatest post-season performers.  We were lucky to call Andy one of our own, and I am glad that he was never dealt away in one of those knee-jerk type of trades that we saw during the George Steinbrenner regime.  Sorry, George, I miss you but you gotta admit that some of those trades left a little bit to be desired…

Getting back on track, Andy leaves the game being able to stand shoulder to shoulder with the greatest lefty in Yankees’ history, the Chairman of the Board, Whitey Ford.  The Core Four (Rivera, Pettitte, Jorge Posada, and Derek Jeter) did an excellent job in reaching the pinnacle of their positions in franchise history.  Posada may not have matched Yogi Berra, Bill Dickey or Thurman Munson, but he can stand in the same room.  DJ is obviously one of the greatest shortstops in the team’s history (along with Phil Rizzuto).  For a team so stacked in history and tradition, four contemporary players reaching the upper echelon is amazing.  It is the end of a terrific Yankees era, and as much as I hate to see Derek Jeter go out with an injury filled career, I would prefer for him to leave now rather than to come back next year for what most likely will be a year of reduced relevance on the roster.

What does the future hold?…

I really do not know what to expect next year.  At the moment, it is uncertain if Robinson Cano or Curtis Granderson will be back.  Joe Girardi is talking about needing time to decide if he wants to come back which is not a good sign in my opinion.  Mark Texeira will be back next year, but he is deteriorating as he ages.  I am not sure that CC can get back to being the dominant pitcher he once was, and the line-up is filled with age and injury-susceptible players.  The farm system at the upper levels is weak, at best.  While many of said that this has been a great year of managing by Joe Girardi, I’d argue that it has not been one of Brian Cashman’s best years.  I do not know how much he has been constrained by ownership, but the 10 wins that the team could have used this season could have been acquired through smart and strategic moves.  The farm system is very lacking at the upper levels and I know that injuries have played a part, but at some point, Cashman has to be held accountable.  Like fine wine, it is harvest season except the Yankees do not have anything to harvest.  They’ll have to overpay and to give up too much young talent to field a championship squad next season.  Unfortunately, neither makes sense even for the Yankees, so it feels as though we are in the midst of an era of transition.  Hopefully, greatness will be waiting on the other side…

–Scott

 

A sad day, indeed…

 

Sadly, the fear is confirmed…

Today brought the news that this is the final season for Andy Pettitte.  I knew we were getting close to the end and of course, a disappointing season does not help.  If the Yankees were a cinch to make the play-offs, this might be a different story.  Winning seems to make those aches and pains hurt a little bit less.  Nevertheless, I am grateful for the time that Andy gave us.  I missed him those three years he was in Houston and of course the prior year of retirement.  But I am glad he came back both times and there’s no doubt that he’s a Yankee for life.

As much as I dislike and disrespect a certain third baseman on the active roster, I forgave Andy for the mistakes in his past.  He came clean (unlike the “Fraud” or Roger Clemens) and he proved to us that his words were truthful and from the heart.  Andy may never get into the Hall of Fame due to the steroid use, but he deserves a place in Memorial Park.  Like Mariano Rivera, I truly enjoyed Andy in pinstripes and knew that he gave us his “all” with every performance, win or lose.

I hope the team is smart enough to give him an invitation to come to spring training as an instructor and of course his presence at Old Timer’s Day is a must.  With Sunday being Mariano Rivera Day, it is so appropriate that the scheduled starting pitcher is Andy.  There would be nothing better than to watch Andy hand the ball to Mo with the appearance of no other Yankee relievers.  Hopefully, the game plays out to that form.  I love that Andy’s final two games are the aforementioned Mo Rivera Day and the final game against his former team, the Houston Astros.  There’s probably not a better away city for Andy to pitch his final game in than his home city.  As George Strait would say, “The Cowboy Rides Away”…

Thanks, Andy.  You gave us very memorable years and we always, without exception, were pleased when you took the ball.  You brought your heart and soul to every game and as a fan, there is nothing more that I could ask for.  Time and again, you stopped losing streaks and you were money in October.  The pickoff move was simply the best.  The guy from Deer Park, Texas proved that he bled pinstripes and you’ll always be remembered as one of the greatest lefties in Yankees history.  There will never be anything that we could give to you that would approach what you gave to us.  We will be forever your fans.

On the other hand…

While I was glad the Yankees emerged victorious against the defending World Champion San Francisco Giants (as a Bay Area resident, I might add), it was disturbing to see Alex Rodriguez eclipse the legendary Lou Gehrig for the all-time record for career grand slams.  Man for man, there is no way that A-Fraud could even stand in the shadow of the Iron Horse.  This is a travesty and in my opinion deserves an asterisk.

I will be glad when the day arrives that A-Fraud is a “former” Yankee.  I never want to see this loser on Yankee Stadium turf ever again when that happens.  Too bad the Yankees can’t trade the Fraud back to Seattle so that they can disassociate themselves from the worst mistake of the post-George Steinbrenner regime.

–Scott

Looking forward to A-Rod’s “Going Away” Party!…

 

He’s a fraud but wait for the hearing…

My position on Alex Rodriguez has not changed.  I do not like A-Rod, the player, and I do not respect “A-Fraud”, the man.  I am anxious for him to begin serving his suspension as he represents everything that is wrong about baseball.  But I have to side with those who think the actions of Ryan Dempster to throw at A-Rod in a recent Red Sox-Yankees game was wrong.  The players do not have the right to be the judge, jury and executioner.  There is a process and A-Fraud is properly following his right to appeal.  It is unfortunate that an actual hearing is so far off, but it is what it is.  At the end of the day, A-Fraud will be suspended and he’ll be banned from games while those currently serving their 50-game suspensions have returned and hopefully have learned from their past mistakes.

Each day that A-Fraud plays, it sickens me.  It bothers me that with each home run, he inches ever so closely to the great Willie Mays in career home run totals.  A-Fraud will never be the man that Willie Mays is, and I will never recognize A-Fraud as a better home run hitter or player for that matter than Mays.  Alex Rodriguez is where he is in career stats because he cheated.  He was fortunate that the rules of baseball, at least those written, did not prohibit him from his actions for the majority of his younger days.  But morally, he was wrong then and legally, he is wrong now.

I am not sure what the 2014 Yankees will look like with A-Fraud on the sidelines (assuming that he serves his full 211-game suspension).  But then again, that’s for GM Brian Cashman and the Steinbrenner family to figure out.  As much as I wanted him to succeed, Kevin Youkilis is not the answer.  Maybe as a role player, but not as the starting third baseman.  The Yankees are in trouble if they are forced to use a mix of Jayson Nix and Eduardo Nunez.

The Boston Red Sox got better quickly because they were able to blow up the roster and unload some heavy, excess baggage.  The Yankees really need to do the same thing, but of course, the opportunity may not be there.  I am not sure that 2013 has been Brian Cashman’s best year, and it’s always possible that the Steinbrenner family moves in a different direction this off-season.  Cashman’s inability to bring anything more than cast-off’s from other rosters to the team could be directly the fault of the Steinbrenners.  But they are not going to sever ways with themselves.  It would not surprise me at all to see Cashman in some place like Seattle next season.

I’ve missed Soriano’s excitement…

Alfonso Soriano may look and act like an old man next season, but for this season, he has been one of the few bright spots.  I have enjoyed to see his resurgence in the Bronx, and he is very deserving of the accolades that he has received.  While I want to see Soriano back next season, it is time for the organization to begin making some hard decisions on the older players.  Plus, they need to “fatten” CC Sabathia back up again (okay, just kidding, but there might to something to the belief that the change in weight has adversely impacted his mechanics).  I don’t think there is an easy solution on how to re-build the Yankees quickly.  There are too many holes and not enough major league ready talent in the farm system.

The Yankees should be free to catch the season premiere of “The Walking Dead”…

I still do not believe the Yankees will make the play-offs this year.  The hill is too steep and they just do not have the pieces to pull off a September charge to chase down the other wild card contenders.  As I wrote this post, the Yankees lost to the team that they have generally beaten this season, the Toronto Blue Jays.  The Jays were up 6-0 after 2 innings so it was clear that it was not going to be their night.  But it was worse that the Yankees had arguably their best pitcher on the mound in Hiroki Kuroda.  This game is a microcosm of the season.  The Yankees have built too large of a hole to overcome.

 

–Scott

 

 

 

Why does A-Rod get a free pass?…

The opening game of the Yankees-White Sox Series was a loss before the first pitch was thrown…

I am a Yankees fan and I’ve been one since 1974 but today, I am disgusted.  It is revolting to see Alex Rodriguez take third base for tonight’s game against the Chicago White Sox on a day when he was suspended for 211 games.  All other 12 PED users who were suspended accepted their fates and are serving their 50-game sentences.  But the guiltiest of all (thus, the longer penalty) is playing baseball because he chose the appeal process.  He has blood on his fingers and the gun was in his hand, yet as typical A-Fraud, he refuses to take personal responsibility for his actions.  I am sure that somehow his cousin or maybe bad advice he received from Francisco Cervelli will ultimately be to blame for his latest problems, but for now, he only blames Bud Selig and the people who really know and understand what a miserable human being he is.

Even if it means counting A-Rod’s scheduled salaries against the Yankees for the purposes of the salary cap, I want this guy gone.  He disgraces the Yankee pinstripes and he tarnishes the great storied franchise.  Tonight, I actually found myself cheering for the Chicago White Sox because it was too hard to root for a Yankees lineup that features A-Fraud in the middle of the order.  My lifelong idol has been Lou Gehrig.  He wore the pinstripes very proudly and he was a true Yankee from start to finish.  A-Fraud is the anti-Gehrig.  He has disgraced the uniform since the beginning and the end can’t get here soon enough.  I had truly wished that I had seen the last of A-Fraud in a Yankees uniform, yet here he is playing third base tonight.

Per the YES Network’s website, the Yankees released this statement:

“We are in full support of Major League Baseball’s Joint Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. We also recognize and respect the appeals process. Until the process under the Drug Program is complete, we will have no comment. We are confident that the process outlined in the Drug Program will result in the appropriate resolution of this matter. In the meantime, the Yankees remain focused on playing baseball.

However, we are compelled to address certain reckless and false allegations concerning the Yankees’ role in this matter. The New York Yankees in no way instituted and/or assisted MLB in the direction of this investigation; or used the investigation as an attempt to avoid its responsibilities under a player contract; or did its medical staff fail to provide the appropriate standard of care to Alex Rodriguez.

Separately, we are disappointed with the news today of the suspension of Francisco Cervelli. It’s clear that he used bad judgment.”

Where does it say that the Yankees had to start Alex Rodriguez tonight?  Why does this guy get a privileged card?  Less guilty players are done for the year yet A-Fraud is on the field.  It makes me sick, disgusted and angry.  If I were Hal Steinbrenner, I can tell you there’s no way that A-Fraud would have been swinging a bat tonight.  He’d be picking splinters out of his derriere.

Interesting that the Yankees call out Francisco Cervelli, yet sound like they are posturing with Alex Rodriguez without any condemnation.  You can never convince me that Cervelli is as despicable and dishonest as A-Fraud.

I am a Yankees fan, but admittedly it is out of protest until the team does the right thing and separates themselves from the most dishonorable and narcissistic player in franchise history.

The White Sox are still throttling the Yanks in tonight’s game (8-0 in the bottom of the 6th inning).  Good.  Now, if Robin Ventura could take a bat and stick it up A-Rod’s…

–Scott

When Does the WBC Start? Not Soon Enough…

A-Rod – What else are we going to talk about?

I found it somewhat humorous Alex Rodriguez said that he will be under intense scrutiny for “the next 18 months to 24 months”.  Interesting how one can predict the exact time frame involved in the ‘post-confession’ period.  Does that mean we are guaranteed of no reference to A-Rod in March 2011?  Looking forward to it!

Personally, I don’t blame Alex for not wanting to talk about his past drug use following the press conference earlier in the week.  If he talked, he’d run the risk of contradicting his previous comments…

Wallace Matthews of Newsday wrote a great piece today about how GM Brian Cashman wanted to ‘move on’ when A-Rod opted out of his ‘drug-induced’ $250 million contract in 2007.  Cashman’s position has gone largely unnoticed until now, but he could have saved the organization from much embarrassment.  A-Rod’s return only came about when A-Rod bypassed agent Scott Boras and dealt with the Yankees and Hank Steinbrenner directly.

 A day after his 'roid-related press conference, Alex Rodriguez returned to the field Wednesday for the start of spring training.

Credit:  Altaffer/AP

 

It should come as a welcome relief when A-Rod joins the Dominican Republic World Baseball Classic team early next month.  Egads!  The reporters in Yankees camp will have only baseball to talk about!  Of course, there might be mention of the scandalous time that Mark Teixeira took a couple of Advil for a post-game headache…

More Yankees in the Headlines?

I have to admit that I was startled for a moment when I saw the headline about the frozen assets belonging to Johnny Damon and Xavier Nady.  Of course, it is clear that they are innocent victims.  The government’s freeze of a company affiliated with Robert Allen Stanford impacted accounts owned by Damon and Nady.

Neither Damon nor Nady invested directly with Stanford funds but rather they invested through broker dealers whose accounts were with a Stanford company.

It was reported that Damon complained of being unable to pay his bills and Nady could not put down a deposit on a New York apartment.  I find it surprising that both would wrap up their assets through a single source.  I guess diversification is not something they are concerned with.  I also find it interesting that both players are represented by agent Scott Boras.  Thanks for the sound financial advice, Scott!  And, oh by the way, Jason Varitek sends his love!

Credit:  Branimir Kvartuo/AP

 

The Return of Bernabe Figueroa Williams

Enjoy camp for a few days, Bernie, but don’t get used to it!

I have to admit that it was both strange and exciting to see Bernie Williams wearing Yankee gear with number 51 on his back.  However, that does not mean I would want to see him make a comeback with the team.  At this point, I’d clearly prefer Nick Swisher over Bernie.  I thought Bernie was a great Yankee but time has moved on.

Williams and Derek Jeter last played together in 2006 ...

Credit:  Antonelli/New York Daily News

 

Then again, Phillies pitcher Jamie Moyer won a world championship at age 45, winning 16 games in 2008.  But c’mon, this guy just doesn’t age…

 

Bernie had begun a significant decline by 2006, and there is no chance that future years will be any better.  He played more and better than expected in 2006, but it was time to turn the page.  His presence on the roster would potentially prevent the presence of a younger player with more potential.

Upon completion of the WBC, Bernie should focus on his musical career.  His latest CD, Moving Forward, is scheduled for release on April 14, 2009. The CD includes a special live performance with Bruce Springsteen and Patti Scialfa.

 

 

In A-Rod We Trust…or Not…

MORE A-ROD THOUGHTS

A day later, I am still stunned by the developments revealed on Saturday regarding Alex Rodriguez and his apparent steroid use in 2003.

The last thing I wanted to see was vindication for Jose Canseco but here it is for him with A-Rod’s name smeared across every sports page in America.

I am troubled that A-Rod knew he had tested positive and he had to have known there was always the possibility the information would be leaked one day (particularly considering the ongoing government investigation and the case against Barry Bonds).  He had over five years to think about this day, yet none of A-Rod’s subsequent statements has given any hints of possible drug use. 

When the “A-Fraud” comments came out through Joe Torre’s book, The Yankee Years, Johnny Damon and Derek Jeter came to A-Rod’s defense…even Larry Bowa.  It will be interesting to see if they are so quick to come to A-Rod’s defense this time.

Alex needs to be honest about his past drug use, giving us some insight into why.  An apology for all concerned is expected, and it is up to him to convince us that the drug use did not continue.

The next few days will be very critical for A-Rod, and they will shape the future perception of him.  He has a chance to right the “wrong”.  Alex, it is up to you…

YANKEES CAMP OPENS ON FRIDAY THE 13TH

On the bright side, Yankees camp open on Friday for pitchers and catchers.  It will be great to see CC Sabathia and A.J. Burnett arrive in Tampa.  The first photo of Sabathia and Burnett together with Chien-Ming Wang, Andy Pettitte, and Joba Chamberlain will be a classic.

It’s unfortunate that Joe Girardi will be beseiged by A-Rod questions, but hopefully, he’ll have the time to enjoy the presence of the greatest Yankee pitching staff in years.

NO PRESSURE ENVIRONMENT

Andruw Jones is clearly seeking a pressure-free environment.  By signing a minor league deal with the Texas Rangers, he’ll avoid the media glare that would have accompanied a signing with Boston or New York.  But his chances of actually making the team are no less secure.

Andruw is a mystery to me.  In 1996, he looked like he was poised for a Hall of Fame career.  But by 2008, he looked tired and worn out.  He was offered an invitation to go to camp with the Yankees, which he declined.  When asked about Boston, he said “it’s too cold”.  That sounds like someone who clearly wasn’t up to the task of ‘trying to be the best, with the best’.  Good luck in Texas, Andruw…well, at least until you get the pink slip in late March…

ANOTHER QUALITY MOVE BY THE PHILLIES

Good for the Phillies in re-signing arbitration eligible first baseman Ryan Howard to a three-year, $54 million contract.  Ryan succeeded in achieving his desired annual salary of $18 million and the Phillies locked up one of their young stars through 2011.  It is going to be fun watching the Mets and Phillies slug it out this year…

JANE HELLER, YANKEE FAN EXTRAORDINAIRE

Jane Heller wrote a great article for The New York Times today.  When all else fails, visit a psychic!  A very funny approach about predicting the Yankees’ 2009 season… 

I have started reading my copy of ‘Confessions of a She-Fan’.  So far, so good, except for the natural physique reference about A-Rod in the prologue in comparison to “those ‘roid guys with their cartoon muscles…”.  Oh well, he fooled all of us.  Jane’s book has that great, refreshing ‘we’re right there with you’ feel to it.  I am definitely re-living my emotions and feelings about the 2007 Yankees as I read the book…

And for the prediction?  I’ll go with Jane’s “Nope, I’m good”…

 

 

You’ll have to talk to the Union…

An offseason that began with so much promise and excitement has quickly turned in recent weeks.  First, there was the controversy surrounding Joe Torre’s new book, The Yankee Years.  Today, we have the revelation by SI.com that Alex Rodriguez tested positive for steroids in 2003 when he was the MVP for the Texas Rangers.

What does this mean?  It will be interesting to see how the team responds to the firestorm that is sure to engulf the team over the next few weeks.  If the “A-Fraud” tag originated as a joke, it will now become the staple in any article written about Alex.  For a player so caught up with his own image and statistics, this should prove to be a very trying and challenging time for A-Rod.

The media had already begun a recent witch hunt for negative stories associated with baseball’s most storied franchise and their return to the days of the “Evil Empire” with the huge free agent signings during the winter.  Several articles written late in the week were speculating about the drama that will unfold when Derek Jeter’s contract expires in two years.  Do you re-sign a 37 year old shortstop?  Do you move him to center field or one of the corner spots?  Do you move on, and end the relationship with arguably the best shortstop in franchise history?  C’mon, that’s two years down the road.  Much can happen between now and then.  But it does show that the media will immediately latch on to the latest A-Rod story and won’t let it go anytime soon.  If there are 104 players on the list of players who tested positive in 2003, I am curious why the other 103 names aren’t being mentioned.  Well, I know why, but that doesn’t mean that the others should be ignored or allowed a “mulligan”.

I feel that Alex needs to respond quickly and effectively.  Of course, his initial comments show that he is not quite ready to accept responsibility.  When approached by a reporter, he simply said “You’ll have to talk to the Union”.  Alex needs to ‘come clean’ and accept full responsibility for his actions.  He needs to apologize to the fans that he misled, and he must show the proper degree of remorse.  The way Alex responds in the coming days will significantly determine how he is remembered as a player and as a man.

Nobody told Hal Steinbrenner or Joe Girardi that this was going to be easy…

 

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